4 results for month: 12/2010


Bonne fête!

We love how children will use their imagination to re-conceive the garden space, adapting to whatever the climate may be! The garden under a lot of snow can become a survival adventure, filled with "danger", and the required need to find shelter and food. It is amazing! A great big thanks to those of you who made a donation this holiday season! Hope your loved ones enjoyed the cards displaying the joyful harvest that school food gardening can bring about in children's lives! Happy new year everyone. And to a great 2011 growing season! Hopefully you'll stay tuned for these delicious and edible urban growing adventures! Below, a couple more winter fun ...

School gardens get funding stateside

Recently passed legislation called the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, S.3307: includes the following: Connecting More Children to Healthy Local Produce through Farm-to-School Programs The bill provides $40 million in mandatory funding to help schools establish school gardens and source local foods into their cafeterias. This is great news, and we look forward to the Canadian equivalent.

Winter garden programming & season extension

Greetings y'all! Ah yes, the first notable snowfall in Toronto befall the city last week (and more was dumped yesterday!). Thankfully, we have put hoop houses on many of our garden beds at all of the schools, to extend the life of some of the greens. One might think that garden programming ends when it gets cold outside, but not true at all! In fact, not only are children able to extend the growing season with aforementioned hoop houses, made out of hula hoops, recycled telephone wire, thick clear plastic and office clips, but also seed more leafy greens, collect seeds for next spring, and continue composting. The neat thing about composting in the ...

Food Secure Canada Assembly Update

Xuan-Yen, here. We had a whirlwind of a weekend, jam packed with presenting, workshops, networking and enjoying the company of fellow food involved people November 26th to the 28th in Montreal at the Biennial Food Secure Canada Assembly. Both Sunday and I spoke on a panel discussing schools as a space for nutrition, in both official languages Saturday morning.  It was my first time presenting in French at a conference. We shared how we are able to maintain our garden-based programming all year round by implementing numerous strategies and engaging with the community. We had an opportunity to see what other organizations were doing, especially ...